Honour Roll

We need you

To commemorate the centenary of World War 1, Wollongong City Libraries will develop an innovative online resource – Illawarra Remembers 1914-1918 – which will include information and photographs that tell the stories of the Illawarra’s brave men and women who went to war. We need your help.

There are a number of Honour Rolls and Memorials across the Illawarra which commemorate the men and women involved in the war. Below is a photograph of the Roll of Honour at Unanderra Public School (NB. The rolls and memorials may have changed location since the time the photograph was taken).

Unanderra Public School : The Great War 1914-1919

Unanderra Honour Roll

Aitkin F.
Burke F.
Banfield H.E (M.C)
Burgess W.
Burgess L.
Brewer C.
Cawe E.S
Chapman W.
Catterall A.V
Cooper C.B
Cochrane H.
Corfian J.
Chinnock A.E
Colbert W.
Duxbury J.S
Fishlock G (M.S.M)
Fishlock L
Ferriss C.
Franklin W.
Franklin B.
Franklin P.
Fackender E.
Grogan R.
Gorrell J.K
Gorrell S.
Gorrell W.
Hepburn H.
Hargrave E.A
Jeffrey E.
Lindsay S.W
Lindsay W.
Lindsay W.F (M.C)
Lindsay T.F
Lindsay E.A
Lindsay G.
Lawless R.
Stevens J.R
Stevens W.A
Muir F.W
Mooney F.
Neaves H.H
Neaves A.E
Osborne E.
Richardson J.W
Rodgers P.
Rodgers W.
Richards R
Stapleton W.
Spinks J.K
Thompson H.
Thompson W.
Timothy E.
Timothy S.
Warrington A.R
Warrington F.
Wright W.
Warrington Nurse Dora

This Honour Roll can be found and Unanderra Primary School, Princes Highway, Unanderra. [1]

If anyone has any information about the names on this Honour Roll (or any other), please let us know either through the contact page, in person at Wollongong Reference Library or by calling the Reference Library on (02) 4227 7414.


[1] Compiled by Illawarra Family History Group Inc, Illawarra Remembers: War Memorials of the Illawarra, Printed by University of Wollongong Printery, Wollongong NSW, August 1995.

John Harold Richardson

John ‘Jack’ Harold Richardson was born on 10 May, 1883. Before the war, he resided at Bondi with his family and worked in his father’s produce store.

John Richardson wearing NSW Scottish Regiment uniform.

John Richardson wearing NSW Scottish Regiment uniform.

When he enlisted, he joined the 4th Battalion AIF.

During his service, Jack frequently sent postcards and letters to his wife, three children (at the time) and mother. He sent a postcard to his wife on 25 May, 1917:

Embroided postcard to Jack's wife, 'Cis.'

Embroided postcard to Jack’s wife, ‘Cis.’

My Cis,  As you will see, from the fact that I am able to get a bet of a card like this, I am well away from the firing line for awhile ... knows how long this will last though. We blew into this little town of – two days for a spell. After that Lord knows what it will be; however I suppose your papers will soon be telling you again that the old fighting... is into it again somewhere ... cheer up, it looks like soon coming to the end. Goodbye with heaps of kisses – ... Your Jack.

My Cis,
As you will see, from the fact that I am able to get a … of a card like this, I am well away from the firing line for awhile … knows how long this will last though. We blew into this little town of – two days for a spell. After that Lord knows what it will be; however I suppose your papers will soon be telling you again that the old fighting brigade is into it again somewhere … Anyhow cheer up, it looks like soon coming to the end. Goodbye with heaps of kisses – …
Your Jack.

Jack moved to Wollongong in 1927 with his wife Annie Cecilia Hawkins (nee) and worked  as a janitor at Wollongong Technical College on Gladstone Ave. He and his wife had three more children after the war and he became a life member of Wollongong RSL. His RSL medals currently reside at Wollongong RSL Club.

He died on 24 January 1954 at the age of 71 at Concord Hospital, Sydney.

"I Cling To You" Card fromg 'Jack to Cis.'

“I Cling To You”
Card fromg ‘Jack to Cis.’

Number of medals.

Number of medals.

Emily Rebecca Mary Parsons

Emily Mary Parsons was born in Sydney; she lived in Wollongong after the war. Her father was Alfred Thomas Parsons. She enlisted on 1 September 1916 as a ‘Field Nurse (AANS)’ at the age of 26 and embarked on 9 December 1916 from Sydney on the ship, SS Kaiser-i-Hind[1]. With prior training in nursing, she was stationed in a numbers of places such as Egypt in 1914 and then at the 50th General Hospital Salonika, Greece from late 1914 to 1918.

Nurse Parsons returned on SS Alexandra Woermann sometime between May and July, 1919.

She received a Greek Medal for Military Merit and has been listed in the London and Australian Gazette[2]. Honours and awards were given in recognition of gallant or distinguished conduct of service.

Family members have generously shared a twenty-page book of drawings contributed by various patients and staff at the 50th General Hospital, Salonika, Greece.

STEWA_R-01.19STEWA_R-01.7STEWA_R-01.11


[1] Australian War Memorial, First World War Embarkation Rolls – Emily Rebecca Mary Parsons, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, < http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/nominal_rolls/first_world_war_embarkation/person/R2051466/&gt;, viewed 20 November 2013.

[2] Australian War Memorial, Honours and Awards – Emily Rebecca Mary Parsons, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, < http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/honours_and_awards/person/R1536302/?roll_type=Awards&gt;, viewed 20 November 2013.

Wilfred Lawson Appleby

Wilfred Lawson Appleby was born in England to Edward and Jane Ann Appleby. He was 20 years old and lived in Keiraville, Wollongong when he enlisted. His service records state that he had previous military training to enlisting, this included: 1 year Senior Cadets at South Coast NSW and the 37th Infantry ‘F. Company,’ Unanderra. He worked as a bricklayer prior to the war.

NAA: B2455, APPLEBY W L

NAA: B2455, APPLEBY W L

Service photo of W.L Appleby

Service photo of W.L Appleby

It was announced in the Illawarra Mercury on 3 December 1915 that Wilfred ‘who held the position of lieutenant in the Citizens’ Forces, which he resigned in order to enlist as a private in the Expeditionary Forces, has been promoted in the trenches to the positions of lieutenant.’

APPELBY-03-12-13-IMP2

He was wounded multiple times. On May 15, 1916 he was admitted to the 24th General Hospital after suffering from a gunshot wound to the shoulder.

He was often featured in the Illawarra Mercury, on one occasion his letter was posted[1]:

Illawarra Mercury 22/10/1915

Illawarra Mercury 22/10/1915

Wilfred was killed in action on 20 September, 1917 in Belgium. According to the Australian War Memorial, his grave is located at Perth Cemetery (China Wall), Belgium[2].

NB. Wilfred Appleby is often listed as Wilfred Appelby.

NAA: B2455, APPLEBY W L


[1] ‘Keiraville’, Illawarra Mercury, 03 December 1915, p. 2.

[2] Australian War Memorial, First World War Embarkation Rolls – Wilfred Lawson Appleby, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, < http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/roll_of_honour/person/R1728581/&gt;, viewed 20 November 2013.

Nurse Wakeford

Muriel Leontine Wakeford was born in 1887 at Bathurst, NSW. She was a nurse by occupation, trained in Sydney and was one of the youngest nurses in the war at the time. Muriel enlisted as a Staff Nurse and embarked from Sydney in November 1914 on HMAT Kyarra, A55;[1] at the time she was living on Crown St, Wollongong. Muriel attained the rank of ‘Sister’ only four days after enlisting.

WAKEN-03

Nurse Muriel Wakeford

She kept a diary where she recollected her day and wrote down events during her time as a war nurse. She kept record from the beginning of her involvement:

A momentous day indeed. At 4pm we pushed off from Circular Quay amidst wild enthusiasm and also a terrific storm. The ferry boats all saluted, the crowd cheered and I felt pretty miserable. My first experience at sea. The night was wild indeed – three sea men were knocked over by the elements and one had to be operated on next morning. I was fortunate enough to be able to assist at the operation. Unique experience at sea. (November 24th Wednesday, 1914)

She continued writing during her time in the war.

The wounded came down to the shore in an endless stream. Accommodation on the hospital ship Gascon soon gave out. After that occurred there seemed to be no one in charge of direction wounded men to any one ship in particular…” Sister Muriel Wakeford, Diary, 25 April 1915.[2]

On April 24, the day before the Anzac landing, Muriel Wakeford and Ella Jane Tucker were originally aboard the hospital ship, Cecilia in Murdos Harbour but due to a change of plan the nurses were told to board another hospital ship, the Gascon.

Nurse Wakeford relaxing on "Gascon."

Nurse Wakeford relaxing on “Gascon.”

The hospital ship, Gascon was overcrowded with only 400 beds and no other hospital ships available. The Gascon received seriously wounded men and well as the ‘walking wounded’ who often assisted with other injured soldiers boarding the ship. The nurses and staff worked flat out dressing wounds and removing fragments of shrapnel and bullets.[3]

As part of her duties, Wakeford and the other nurses administered morphine and gave the patients as much as they needed without seeking a doctor’s permission unlike the standard practice in civilian hospitals.[4] They spent their time treating the soldiers as best they could, feeding and washing their wounds. Any spare moment was taken up by preparing the wards and equipment for the next influx of soldiers. In a letter to her parents, Muriel wrote that in April at Gaba Tepe, there were over forty deaths in a three day trip.

Nurses, including Wakeford upon the hospital ship, "Gascon."

Nurses, including Wakeford upon the hospital ship, “Gascon.”

Muriel was a prolific writer and sent pleas to the Illawarra Mercury for more Australian doctors and nurses to enlist. This was published although censorship was enforced. Her revealing letter written in mid-May published in the Illawarra Mercury described the terrible wounds inflicted on the Anzacs due to the use of “dum dum” bullets. The revealing article subsequently caused a stir in the district. Although the editor knew he could face prosecution for breaching the War Precautions Act, he published the letter in the public’s interest.[5] She continued writing letters which continued to be published regularly. An example below was published on 11 June 1915.

With the wounded

Although all the nurses were warned that fraternising with the officers was forbidden, she fell in love with Lieutenant Sergeant. The romance was omitted from her diary and was kept a secret on ship as it would have resulted in trouble for both of them. Muriel married Ray Sergeant at East London and as a result, resigned from her position as ‘Staff Nurse.’  Her diary entries ceased at the end December 1915.  She officially resigned from the AANS on 27 June 1916.

Wakeford

One of her last diary entries reveals her trip home to Australia:

Up at 5am when we were just opposite Botany Heads. Go alongside Woolloomooloo Wharf at 9.30am. A band played “Home Sweet Home” just as we were getting alongside. A big crowd greeted us. We left for Wollongong at 4.50pm. When we arrived a big crowd met up at the station and cheered heartily as the train steamed in. Escorted us home in motor cars (19 October, 1915).

Muriel and her husband lived in Kenya for a time as Ray was a harbour master at Mombasa. Later, they returned to London, England where Muriel lived for remainder of her life. She returned to Australia on one occasion with her son so that he could meet her mother and the rest of the family. In Australia, she petitioned Canberra for her war medals which were ultimately forwarded to her.[6] She died in England in 1965.

Muriel Wakeford is linked to a local soldier, Oliver Heard who became her brother-in-law in 1919 when he married her sister, Vera Wakeford.

The information provided has been passed on by Muriel’s family. Her letters published by the  Illawarra Mercury can be accessed through microfilm archives which are currently available to all at Wollongong Library. Susanna De Vries has published a book, Australian Heroines of World War One: Gallipoli which is a well-researched account of Nurse Wakeford.


[1] Australian War Memorial, First World War Embarkation Rolls – Muriel Wakeford, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, <http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/nominal_rolls/first_world_war_embarkation/person/R1813433/&gt;, viewed 2 October 2013.

[2] S De Vries, Australian Heroines of World War One: Gallipoli, Lemmos and the Western Front, Pigros Press, Brisbane, 2013, p. 66.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid p. 86.

[6] J Duffy, ‘Tales of a World War I heroine,’ Illawarra Mercury, April 21 2013, available from http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/1446493/tales-of-a-world-war-i-heroine/, viewed October 9, 2013.
Australian War Memorial, Australian Imperial Force – Nominal Roll, Australian War Memorial, Canberra, 2013 <http://www.awm.gov.au/collection/records/awm8/26/66/awm8-26-66-1-0132.pdf&gt;, viewed 2 October, 2013.

Australian War Memorial, First World War Embarkation Rolls – Muriel Wakeford, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, <http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/nominal_rolls/first_world_war_embarkation/person/R1813433/&gt;, viewed 2 October 2013.

De Vries, S, Australian Heroines of World War One: Gallipoli, Lemmos and the Western Front, Pigros Press, Brisbane, 2013.

Duffy, J, ‘Tales of a World War I heroine,’ Illawarra Mercury, April 21 2013, available from http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/1446493/tales-of-a-world-war-i-heroine/, viewed October 9, 2013.

Unknown soldiers

Australia in Palestine was purchased at the Lifeline book fair. To the surprise of the purchasers, there were images of soldiers from the First World War wedged between the pages. These photos have been shared with Wollongong City Libraries and we are now seeking the names of these unknown soldiers as well as details to put the story into context.

If anyone has any information, please let us know either through the contact page, in person at Wollongong Reference Library or calling the Reference Library on (02) 4227 7414. Please make sure let us know which photograph you are referring to.

unknown7.jpgunknown2.jpgunknown1.jpgunknown6.jpgunknown5.jpgunknown4.jpgunknown3.jpg

William Michael George

William Michael George was born at Castlemaine, Victoria. Prior to the war, he worked as a a farrier – a specialist in equine hoof care.

He enlisted on 11 October, 1915 at the age of 25 and joined the 5th Field Artillery Brigade, 1-5 Reinforcements as a gunner.

William Michael George 1914/15.

William Michael George 1914/15.

He embarked from Sydney on 15 January, 1916 on RMS Osterley. In his diary, he writes that there were 500 artillery and about 900 infantry on board, they got off at every port and had a good time. Once they arrived at Heliopolis, they had a big camp full of horses, mules and camels.

16 June 1916
Germans sent out gas last night. Called up at one in the morning and had to put our helmets on, a lot of Australians were gassed.
Have been Corporal since 14 April. My mate Harry Mathias was sent to hospital with a gash in neck on the 14th, kicked by a mule.
Expecting to leave this front shortly for a hotter front around Ypres. Aus artillery infantry doing good work round here.

The brigade fought at the Somme front, they began making their way on 10 July 1916. On June 23rd he wrote, …Our men captured 2 lines of trenches on the Somme. They fought for around three months until leaving on 5 September to go north. William continued fighting with his brigade up until late 1918 when he was injured.

Photo from the front: "18 pounder, 2."

Photo from the front:
“18 pounder, 2.”

He was ultimately discharged on 12 April, 1919 and disembarked for Australia.

Arrived at Sydney without any sickness on board and disembarked on Sunday 18th February at Woolloomooloo Warf where we were driven in motors to the Anzac buffet in the domain and got a great welcome home, was met at buffet by my Dear Mother… also got a great welcome home to Mortdale.

Got my discharge on 17th February and finished my 45 days leave on 12th April 1919… So endeth my adventures at the game they call soldering.

The last page of his diary he has written his total service times:

Total service- 3 years 186 days Service abroad - 3 years 46 days France - 2 years 10 month England - 2 months Egypt - 7 months

Total service- 3 years 186 days
Service abroad – 3 years 46 days
France – 2 years 10 month
England – 2 months
Egypt – 7 months

William was officially discharged on 12 April, 1919. It would not be long until he re-enlisted in the Second World War (15/10/1939).

 

 

NAA: B2455, GEORGE W M

John Hargrave

John Edward Hargrave was originally born ‘Albert Mattison’ or ‘Green’ on 16 June, 1883 in Woonona. Prior to the war, he was a labourer.

John enlisted in Bulli in March, 1917 in the 25th Reinforcements 4th battalion. He was already married to Louisa at the time and they resided at Rixons Pass, Woonona.

John embarked on 31 October, 1917. He was wounded on 3 August 1918 in action due to a sprained ankle after jumping across a trench. He was put on a special sick parade and evacuated the next morning according to the National Archives of Australia.

He returned to Australia on H.M.A.T Suavic on 6 January 1919 and was discharged on 14 February 1919.

John Edward Hargrave (Albert Mattison or Green).

John Edward Hargrave (Albert Mattison or Green) at a wedding.

John died in 1951, Sydney at the age of 67.

In 1937, John wrote to the Defence Department stating that his certificates and medals were destroyed in a house fire; therefore there are no medals available and assumedly service photos. This letter had been uploaded to the National Archives of Australia.

Letter uploaded by NAA.

Letter uploaded by NAA.

 

 

NAA: B2455, HARGRAVE J E

Patrick James Gavin

Patrick James Gavin was born on 26 July, 1885 at Mount Pleasant (Babytown). He attended school at Mount Keira until he was old enough to work in the local coal mines. Later, he moved to Russell St, Balgownie[1] where subsequently he enlisted on 2 February, 1916 at the age of thirty. Patrick was one of the 200 that enlisted from Balgownie; the town had the third highest per cent per population in NSW to enlist in the First World War.

He was in the 1st Light Horse Battalion and embarked from Sydney aboard the R.M.S Malwa for the Mounted Desert Corps in the Sinai Peninsula and Palestine through Beersheba and Damascus.

GAVIN_F_001A

Patrick James Gavin – War medals line the side of the photograph.

He was wounded on 9 January, 1917 and was admitted to the 24th Stationary Hospital in Egypt. He suffered from a gunshot wound to the back.

He returned to Australia on 23 March, 1919 and was welcomed back with others by the Repatriation Committee as well as the P&C at a Peace Celebration in Balgownie. On 12 November, 1920, the residents of Balgownie presented the returned soldiers with a medal and inscribed shield. The medal which was presented to Patrick is in the museum beneath Balgownie Public School.

GAVIN_F_001

Identity tag.

Identity tag.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[1] Australian War Memorial, Australian Imperial Force – 1st Light Horse Regiment, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, <http://static.awm.gov.au/collection/images/large/RCDIG1067093/RCDIG1067093–272-.JPG&gt;, viewed 6 November 2013.

 

 

 

Australian War Memorial, Australian Imperial Force – 1st Light Horse Regiment, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, <http://static.awm.gov.au/collection/images/large/RCDIG1067093/RCDIG1067093–272-.JPG&gt;, viewed 6 November 2013.

NAA: B2455, Gavin P J

Edwin Street

Edwin ‘Ted’ Street, brother of Charles Edward Street was born in Wollongong on August 8, 1891. He was the tenth and the last child of the family; he grew up in Corrimal helping his family on their small farm where they grew fruit, vegetables and flowers.

When Charles was home visiting, he and Edwin enlisted together at the Corrimal enlistment office. The date was June 22, 1916 and he was twenty-four years old at the time. He and his brother sailed from Sydney on October 7, 1916 as part of the 45th Battalion which consisted of around 600 to 700 men. They disembarked at Plymouth, England on November 21, 1919.

For the next few months, he trained at ‘Codford Training Camp.’ Edwin, along with most of the battalion left for France in January 1917; he and his brother were not always assigned together.

Edwin Street, 1916.

Edwin Street, 1916.

Edwin was shot in the shoulder and abdomen and was subsequently hospitalised in late August 1917.

Ted's army issued wallet.

Ted’s army issued wallet.

He returned to Australia in July 1919 after nearly three years overseas and was officially discharged in October that year.

Travel brochure Ted acquired on his return. Targets returning Anzacs.

Travel brochure Ted acquired on his return. Targets returning Anzacs

In June 1921 he married Daisy Olive Grigg. Like many soldiers, he was unsettled on his return so he and Daisy moved to Yanco/Leeton where he would become a farmer. Some of his older brothers lived there.

Farming was not for him so he moved back to Corrimal with Daisy. His older brother, Daniel, started experimenting with a product in small ways years before. Ted decided to take up that project and subsequently laid the foundation of Streets ice cream. Edwin worked on the ice cream in his back shed and would sell it to neighbours along with sweets, cakes and lemonade.[1] He and his wife worked together making and promoting the product which was marketed as ‘The Cream of the Coast.’ Streets is a renowned brand in Australia and Australia’s leading manufacturer of ice cream. [2]

Edwin and his wife had no children but regularly donated to charities and community facilities. His contributions resulted in building of five swimming pools on the South Coast: Corrimal, Batemans Bay, Dapto, Moruya and Narooma.[3]

Ted far right. Others unknown.

Ted far right. Others unknown.

He and Daisy retired to Narooma where he loved to fish. Their family home was willed to become a retirement home/village after they had both passed away.

He died on August 11th 1975 at the age of eighty-three.  

 


[1] Unilever, Streets Ice Cream, Unilever, 2013, < http://www.unilever.com.au/brands-in-action/detail/Streets-Ice-Cream/307424/&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

[2] S Garton, Street, Edwin (Ted) 1891-1975, Australian Dictionary of Biography at the Australian National University, 2013, < http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/street-edwin-ted-13208&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

[3] Ibid.

 

 

Garton Stephen, Street, Edwin (Ted) 1891-1975, Australian Dictionary of Biography at the Australian National University, 2013, < http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/street-edwin-ted-13208&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

NAA: B2455, STREET GEORGE EDWIN.

Unilever, Streets Ice Cream, Unilever, 2013, < http://www.unilever.com.au/brands-in-action/detail/Streets-Ice-Cream/307424/&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.