John Wheeler

John Wheeler, a native of Corrimal was born to Alfred and Grace Wheeler. He was married to Agnes at the time of his enlistment. They had a son, John “Jack” Wheeler. Prior to the war, John worked as a miner.

John Wheeler service photo.

John Wheeler service photo.

John enlisted on 18 January 1916 and jointed the 36th Infantry Battalion. He embarked at Sydney on A51 Ajana on 5 July 1916.[1] He was killed in action later that year on 12 December 1916; he was 25 years of age.

John Wheeler: seated on the left.

John Wheeler: seated on the left.

He is buried at Bailleul Communal Cemetery, France. Bailleul is a large town near the Belgian border. The Communal Cemetery contains 610 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 17 of the graves were destroyed by shell fire and are represented by special memorials.[2]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[1] AWM, Embarkation Rolls – William Hay, Australian War Memorial Canberra, 2013, < http://www.awm.gov.au/research/people/roll_of_honour/person/R1667332/&gt; viewed 4 December 2013.

[2] CWGC, Cemetery details: Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Nord, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, United Kingdom, n.d,  <http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2000048/BAILLEUL%20COMMUNAL%20CEMETERY%20EXTENSION,%20NORD&gt; , viewed 4 December 2013.

Edwin Street

Edwin ‘Ted’ Street, brother of Charles Edward Street was born in Wollongong on August 8, 1891. He was the tenth and the last child of the family; he grew up in Corrimal helping his family on their small farm where they grew fruit, vegetables and flowers.

When Charles was home visiting, he and Edwin enlisted together at the Corrimal enlistment office. The date was June 22, 1916 and he was twenty-four years old at the time. He and his brother sailed from Sydney on October 7, 1916 as part of the 45th Battalion which consisted of around 600 to 700 men. They disembarked at Plymouth, England on November 21, 1919.

For the next few months, he trained at ‘Codford Training Camp.’ Edwin, along with most of the battalion left for France in January 1917; he and his brother were not always assigned together.

Edwin Street, 1916.

Edwin Street, 1916.

Edwin was shot in the shoulder and abdomen and was subsequently hospitalised in late August 1917.

Ted's army issued wallet.

Ted’s army issued wallet.

He returned to Australia in July 1919 after nearly three years overseas and was officially discharged in October that year.

Travel brochure Ted acquired on his return. Targets returning Anzacs.

Travel brochure Ted acquired on his return. Targets returning Anzacs

In June 1921 he married Daisy Olive Grigg. Like many soldiers, he was unsettled on his return so he and Daisy moved to Yanco/Leeton where he would become a farmer. Some of his older brothers lived there.

Farming was not for him so he moved back to Corrimal with Daisy. His older brother, Daniel, started experimenting with a product in small ways years before. Ted decided to take up that project and subsequently laid the foundation of Streets ice cream. Edwin worked on the ice cream in his back shed and would sell it to neighbours along with sweets, cakes and lemonade.[1] He and his wife worked together making and promoting the product which was marketed as ‘The Cream of the Coast.’ Streets is a renowned brand in Australia and Australia’s leading manufacturer of ice cream. [2]

Edwin and his wife had no children but regularly donated to charities and community facilities. His contributions resulted in building of five swimming pools on the South Coast: Corrimal, Batemans Bay, Dapto, Moruya and Narooma.[3]

Ted far right. Others unknown.

Ted far right. Others unknown.

He and Daisy retired to Narooma where he loved to fish. Their family home was willed to become a retirement home/village after they had both passed away.

He died on August 11th 1975 at the age of eighty-three.  

 


[1] Unilever, Streets Ice Cream, Unilever, 2013, < http://www.unilever.com.au/brands-in-action/detail/Streets-Ice-Cream/307424/&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

[2] S Garton, Street, Edwin (Ted) 1891-1975, Australian Dictionary of Biography at the Australian National University, 2013, < http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/street-edwin-ted-13208&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

[3] Ibid.

 

 

Garton Stephen, Street, Edwin (Ted) 1891-1975, Australian Dictionary of Biography at the Australian National University, 2013, < http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/street-edwin-ted-13208&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

NAA: B2455, STREET GEORGE EDWIN.

Unilever, Streets Ice Cream, Unilever, 2013, < http://www.unilever.com.au/brands-in-action/detail/Streets-Ice-Cream/307424/&gt;, viewed October 30 2013.

Charles Edward Street

Charles Edward Street was born on January 31, 1886 in Corrimal; he was one of seven at that point in time.

Charles’ brother owned a farm in Yanco/Leeton where he would often go to work as a farm hand. According to family, he smoked a pipe and had a very cheeky nature.

When war was declared in 1914, Charles was probably back in Corrimal to visit his family when he and his younger brother, Edwin, decided to enlist on June 22, 1916. He was thirty years old at the time.

He sailed from Sydney on October 7, 1916 to disembark at Plymouth, England on November 21, 1916.

Charles Edward Street

Charles Edward Street

The battalion trained for months before they were allowed to leave for France. Charles was a trained sniper.

Postcards sent from Charles.

Postcards sent from Charles.

He was in hospital on numerous occasions with scabies and high fevers of unknown origins. After one such stay, he re-joined his units and was given orders to head to the front line. It was an area 4 miles (6.4 km) south-west of Passchendale. By the time he had reached it, the password had been changed and he was shot and killed by Allied troops on September 30, 1917.

His body was tagged for burial but it was never found.

His parents were notified of his death by telegram approximately six weeks later.

STREEB-06.1

Charles was awarded the British War medal and the Victory Medal. His name is on the Corrimal Memorial as well as the Menin Memorial Gate at Ypres, Belgium.

Victor Dalziel

Victor Dalziel was born at the Gold Rush town of Steiglitz, Victoria on October 7, 1898 and was one of eleven children. His early years were spent in Queensland working as a farmer until he enlisted in June 1918. His brother, Henry Dalziel had been on service in Gallipoli after enlisting in 1915.

He and his brother are credited with discovering tin samples which led to the opening of Boulder Mine near Emuford. This mine was one of the largest mines in the area and remained in production until the 1960s.

Victor Dalziel

Victor Dalziel

He served in the 9th Battalion while on service.

When he returned from the war (1919), he received the nickname ‘Plugger’ as he was regarded as a ‘crack’ rifleman. He married Maud and they had four children, only two of which survived.

They moved to Fairy Meadow with the family and eventually moved to Corrimal where Victor resided until his death from cancer in 1972.

"The Shack." Single handedly built by Victor - one huge room with a fireplace.

“The Shack.”
One huge room with a fireplace; single-handedly built by Victor himself.

He worked as an engineer on the ‘Main Roads Board’ but there were times where he worked in Papua New Guinea as a plantation overseer.

Victor had a saying which he always repeated to his children:

‘An old soldier never dies, he only fades away.’

Victor Dalziel, second from left.

Victor Dalziel, second from left.

These stories and photos have been generously shared with Wollongong City Libraries by Victor’s family.